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Children/Teen Services Librarian

Checklist: Creating Accessible Documents

Documents can be both accessible and inaccessible. It all depends on how it is formatted. This checklist will help you make an accessible and readable document for everyone. The information in this resource is summarized from previous webinars.

Screen Magnification

If you are interested in learning more about screen magnification technologies, this resource is a terrific starting point. The AbilityNet factsheet describes what screen magnification software is and does.

A Novel Mind

A Novel Mind is an excellent resource for children’s literature. The books recommended on this site cover topics such as Mental Health, Autism, Self-Esteem, Bullying and much more.

YA Disability Database

YA (Young Adult) Disability Database is a curated booklist of YA novels that feature disability representation. This database compiles book recommendations together that libraries can use to build their collection or as a resource for patrons.

Accessible library programming for kids and teens

The Centre for Equitable Library Access (CELA) provides resources for libraries to create accessible programming for kids and teens. The resources include tips for making your programming inclusive, considerations about the physical spaces of your programming, and examples of accessible programming.

Social Story: Ready for Reading

The Toronto Public Library (TPL) presents a Social Story to help children become familiar with their library. Social Stories are learning tools for children that describe different experiences and situations they will encounter when visiting their public library. TPL suggests that parents or teachers read this story with their children one or more times before visiting the library to make them feel comfortable about their visit.

Reading System Features, Testing, and Recommendations

The National Network for Equitable Library Service (NNELS) provides an online repository for library patrons with print disabilities. NNELS works with organizations, libraries, and publishers to create accessible books. NNELS has tested and compiled a list of reading systems so that you can choose the reading system that works best for your reading style.

All about reading disabilities: how libraries can support readers with dyslexia

The Centre for Equitable Library Access (CELA) provides content for people with print disabilities and has webinars for libraries and library staff to help them create accessible services and support the needs of their patrons with disabilities. This webinar explores how libraries can support readers with dyslexia.

Quick Reference: Accessibility 101 For Public Libraries

To get you started on your accessibility journey, we’ve summarized information from the Accessibility 101 webinar. The fact and links in this training resource will help you establish foundational knowledge that you can build on.

What is printbraille?

The Centre for Equitable Library Access (CELA) creates informative videos about the accessible content they provide their readers. The “What is printbraille?” video introduces viewers and gives examples of some of the titles available in that format at CELA.

What is a print disability?

The Centre for Equitable Library Access (CELA) provides libraries with informational YouTube videos. This video discusses the term “print disability” and the content CELA provides to serve those patrons.

Described and Captioned Media Program

The Described and Captioned Media Program is a free-loan library of accessible educational media for teachers and family members of K-12 students. The videos available range in subjects from Art History to Sports and Recreation.

Project Enable

Project Enable provides a comprehensive set of training designed specifically for public, academic, or school librarians. This is a completely free resource and contains a group account option that allows your library staff to register and complete the training together.

Project Pals: College Of Communication & Information

Four training modules are centred around making the library accessible for people with autism. The course includes research-based checklists, examples of materials, tip sheets, lists, and templates to implement best practices in your unique library setting. This self-paced course is free to all library workers and volunteers if you create an OCLC account.