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Library Technician or Assistant

Checklist: Creating Accessible Documents

Documents can be both accessible and inaccessible. It all depends on how it is formatted. This checklist will help you make an accessible and readable document for everyone. The information in this resource is summarized from previous webinars.

Screen Magnification

If you are interested in learning more about screen magnification technologies, this resource is a terrific starting point. The AbilityNet factsheet describes what screen magnification software is and does.

Social Story: Ready for Reading

The Toronto Public Library (TPL) presents a Social Story to help children become familiar with their library. Social Stories are learning tools for children that describe different experiences and situations they will encounter when visiting their public library. TPL suggests that parents or teachers read this story with their children one or more times before visiting the library to make them feel comfortable about their visit.

Guide to Image Descriptions

AccessiblePublishing.ca, a website developed by the National Network of Equitable Library Service (NNELS), presents information and resources to help publishers, libraries, and other organizations create and provide access to accessible eBooks.

Reading Systems/Apps Tutorials for Screen Reader Users

users through different reading systems/apps. These YouTube videos are an excellent resource for library staff who want to know how the reading systems/apps are accessible with screen readers.

Reading System Features, Testing, and Recommendations

The National Network for Equitable Library Service (NNELS) provides an online repository for library patrons with print disabilities. NNELS works with organizations, libraries, and publishers to create accessible books. NNELS has tested and compiled a list of reading systems so that you can choose the reading system that works best for your reading style.

All about reading disabilities: how libraries can support readers with dyslexia

The Centre for Equitable Library Access (CELA) provides content for people with print disabilities and has webinars for libraries and library staff to help them create accessible services and support the needs of their patrons with disabilities. This webinar explores how libraries can support readers with dyslexia.

Quick Reference: Accessibility 101 For Public Libraries

To get you started on your accessibility journey, we’ve summarized information from the Accessibility 101 webinar. The fact and links in this training resource will help you establish foundational knowledge that you can build on.

A11Y Project

This website provides a WCAG compliance checklist that you can use to evaluate your digital content and a very comprehensive list of resources relevant to digital accessibility. This is one of the broader resource lists available online, and they do a great job breaking them down into relevant categories.

Android Accessibility Help

This resource provides a quick overview of accessibility settings that library staff can use on Android devices. It could be helpful for troubleshooting with a patron having issues with an Android device.

Apple Accessibility Support

A guide for some of the accessibility features available in Apple products, including VoiceOver, AssistiveTouch, Switch Control, Guided Access, and Voice Control. There is also a braille user guide for different types of apple devices.

AppleVis

AppleVis is an online resource for blind and low-vision users of Apple products such as the Mac, iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch, and Apple TV. The blog provides guides to various apps and software, reviews of the accessibility of Apple products, and a discussion forum and podcast.

Digital Accessibility Courses & Accessibility Reference Library

Deque University provides an extensive curriculum of self-guided online courses so you can focus on the skills you need with the flexibility your schedule requires. Along with courses, this site also offers valuable resources such as guides to using screen readers, an ARIA JavaScript pattern library, and a page with a detailed breakdown of disability demographics.

Knowbility

Knowbility is a nonprofit organization with the mission of improving technology access for millions of youth and adults with disabilities all over the world. They provide several services, including accessibility testing, auditing, training, and a regularly updated comprehensive blog on web accessibility.

General Resources on Disabilities

The National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled (NLS) from the Library of Congress created a list covering braille, devices, and general disability resources. Some of the resources are specific to American library services, but it contains some valuable guides on resources such as assistive technology, education, employment advice, and more.

Project Enable

Project Enable provides a comprehensive set of training designed specifically for public, academic, or school librarians. This is a completely free resource and contains a group account option that allows your library staff to register and complete the training together.

Project Pals: College Of Communication & Information

Four training modules are centred around making the library accessible for people with autism. The course includes research-based checklists, examples of materials, tip sheets, lists, and templates to implement best practices in your unique library setting. This self-paced course is free to all library workers and volunteers if you create an OCLC account.