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Disability Awareness

Disability Language Style Guide

Disability Language Style Guide is also a downloadable PDF that lists appropriate terms and phrases when referring to people with disabilities in publications or conversations. Translated versions are available.

Made by Dyslexia

Made by Dyslexia is a website dedicated to empowering and highlighting dyslexia. It provides information that indicates dyslexia is a skill to be valued and not a hindrance. This website is particularly useful for library staff and anyone who has dyslexia and is focused on its negative implications.

International Dyslexia Association

The International Dyslexia Association has compiled a thorough guide on dyslexia, including helpful lesson plans to ensure students with dyslexia do not face any barriers to learning. The information found on this webpage is incredibly useful not only for people with dyslexia but also for teachers, librarians, and those who work with persons with dyslexia.

Accessibility Etiquette in the Library Panel Discussion

The Accessibility Etiquette panel brings together a group of experts to talk about their positive and negative library experiences, how those experiences could have been improved, with suggestions on how to do so.

Inklusion Events Guide

The Inklusion Guide is designed to help organizers create accessible literature events for in-person, online, and hybrid settings. It contains accessibility best practices and checklists for audience members and event performers.

Creating Accessible Presentations: Features and Tools Slides

In the second webinar in the four-part series about Creating Accessible Presentation Slides, we discuss different features and tools provided by PowerPoint, Google Slides, and Keynote. We will tell you what to avoid (animations) and what to use (captions) when you create accessible presentation slides.

Creating Accessible Presentation: Getting Started Slides

The first webinar in the four-part Creating Accessible Presentations series, learn more about creating inclusive and accessible presentation slides. The slides outline information like colour contrast, font formatting, and accessible hyperlinks.

Checklist: Accessibility 101

We suggest you use this checklist as a guide for library staff when they are starting their accessibility journey or when you provide staff training. The information is summarized from the Accessibility 101 webinar, slides, and the “Quick Reference: Accessibility 101” document.

Best Dyslexia-Friendly Books for Kids

The Book Riot article, Best Dyslexia-Friendly Books for Kids by Rachel Rosenburg, lists 12 awesome books for people with dyslexia. The books, written and formatted for children with dyslexia, are organized into categories like picture books, chapter books, and graphic novels.

Accessible library programming for kids and teens

The Centre for Equitable Library Access (CELA) provides resources for libraries to create accessible programming for kids and teens. The resources include tips for making your programming inclusive, considerations about the physical spaces of your programming, and examples of accessible programming.

Social Story: Ready for Reading

The Toronto Public Library (TPL) presents a Social Story to help children become familiar with their library. Social Stories are learning tools for children that describe different experiences and situations they will encounter when visiting their public library. TPL suggests that parents or teachers read this story with their children one or more times before visiting the library to make them feel comfortable about their visit.

All about reading disabilities: how libraries can support readers with dyslexia

The Centre for Equitable Library Access (CELA) provides content for people with print disabilities and has webinars for libraries and library staff to help them create accessible services and support the needs of their patrons with disabilities. This webinar explores how libraries can support readers with dyslexia.

What is printbraille?

The Centre for Equitable Library Access (CELA) creates informative videos about the accessible content they provide their readers. The “What is printbraille?” video introduces viewers and gives examples of some of the titles available in that format at CELA.

What is a print disability?

The Centre for Equitable Library Access (CELA) provides libraries with informational YouTube videos. This video discusses the term “print disability” and the content CELA provides to serve those patrons.

Accessibility Interview Questions

Accessibility interview questions list potential job interview questions meant to gauge someone’s understanding of digital accessibility.

General Resources on Disabilities

The National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled (NLS) from the Library of Congress created a list covering braille, devices, and general disability resources. Some of the resources are specific to American library services, but it contains some valuable guides on resources such as assistive technology, education, employment advice, and more.

Neil Squire Society

Neils Squire Society is a comprehensive website that offers various services such as accessibility auditing, website and product testing, a service to help businesses develop an accessibility plan, an assistive technology help desk to assist users with their devices, and more.

Disability is a spectrum, not a binary

This blog post clarifies what is meant by “disability” and provides web design tips that could help with accessibility. The article does a good job of putting the importance of universal design in perspective. It explains how removing barriers is ultimately beneficial to everyone using the library.

Project Enable

Project Enable provides a comprehensive set of training designed specifically for public, academic, or school librarians. This is a completely free resource and contains a group account option that allows your library staff to register and complete the training together.